This is the first of a two-part interview with Audrey Tang, Digital Minister of Taiwan. We discuss Taiwan's 2014 Sunflower Student Movement, which marked the first time the country's legislature has been occupied by citizens, and which led to a radical new phase for Taiwanese democracy. 

How have digital networks facilitated the emergence of horizontal power and leaderless organization in Taiwan? Is the continuous participation in Taiwan's ongoing experiment in direct democracy responsible for reducing online trolling and creating constructive digital communities there? And how has the Taiwanese experience, from Sunflower onwards, pointed the way to what's happening right now, in Hong Kong's own Umbrella movement?


Jul 31, 11:05 AM

This is the pilot episode of a new format in which Jamie discusses the news with invited patrons and guests. This is the pilot episode of a new format in which Jamie discusses the news with invited patrons and guests.  In this episode, author and climate consultant Tim Reutemann, and ex-NSA analyst and NewGeld CEO Tim Ofril discuss: why NSA is getting a new Cybersecurity division; the latest advancements with CRISPR and potential IP problems; and Github's censoring of users impacted by US sanctions -- just another sign of the increasing politicization of online platforms.

Links to items discussed on this show:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/health/crispr-gene-editing-blindness-1.5226163

https://www.digitalmunition.me/nsa-to-establish-new-cybersecurity-directorate-to-boost-defense/

https://www.businessinsider.com/microsoft-owned-github-reportedly-blocking-people-in-crimea-iran-sanction-2019-7?r=US&IR=T

In this episode we meet Sean Tilley (aka @deadsuperhero) of We Distribute (and formerly the Diaspora project) to discuss: early days at Diaspora, the first Facebook alternative to really reach critical mass; the steady rise of Mastodon and why the Fediverse its gaining traction; some surprising factors pushing people to move from Big Social to federated social media networks; and whether technologists could (or should) move beyond de-platforming to begin refusing use of their technologies to those whose political ideas they disagree with.


This is the second part of a two-part interview with Tim Tayshun, bitcoin entrepreneur and activist, who dedicated himself to exposing the crypto ponzi scheme, OneCoin. We discuss: how the internet changed the business of running a ponzi; the similarities between scams like OneCoin and the crypto world's ICOs; how OneCoin modeled the way it moved money and on methods used by drug dealers; how Tim used memes to deal some deadly blows to the operation; and why Onecoin -- which by its own account should now be worth more than all US dollars in circulation --- still refuses to die.


In this episode we meet Josephine Wolff, author of a new book on financial and economic cybercrime, You'll See This Message When It Is Too Late.

We discuss two important case studies from the book. First, the massive financial fraud botnet GameOver Zeus, which innovated by using P2P to distribute its command and control infrastructure, and a network of money mules to route funds to its owners, making it extremely hard to detect. The evolution of this botnet in response to Bitcoin shows how cryptocurrency has produced a real paradigm shift in cybercrime - not least in shifting the financial impact of the crime onto the individuals and away from credit card companies and banks.

Moving on to the case of PLA 61398, we discuss the Chinese deployment of hacking resources for economic advancement via China's so-called APT or Advanced Persistent Threat Units. What started with phishing attacks on the email accounts of company offices eventually obtained -- via privilege escalation -- intelligence on pricing, methods, and enough information to tip the balance on crucial trade negotiations. The way China responded to detection shows that it brooks no distinction between political and economic espionage, or America's idea of what is 'okay' and 'not-okay' digital spying.

Wrapping up, we discuss the question of international law and order in the context of massive, distributed cyber operations that remain extremely hard to detect and police. Will multinationals be forced into service as proxies for international co-operation at state level, and into taking responsibility as intermediaries in cybercrime?  How would such politicisation of platforms and services look -- and are we in its first stages already? And finally, could there be a new detente as the great powers understand the leverage they have available to affect each other's critical infrastructures through cyberwarfare?

Josephine Wolff is an assistant professor in the Public Policy department at RIT and a member of the extended faculty of the Computing Security department as well as a fellow at the New America Cybersecurity Initiative. Wolff received her Ph.D. in Engineering Systems: Technology, Management and Policy and M.S. in Technology and Policy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as well as her A.B. in Mathematics from Princeton University. 

Grab Josephine's book, 'You'll See This Message When It Is Too Late,' here at Amazon or at any other traditional online retailers.



In this episode author Cory Doctorow discusses three stories from his new collection, Radicalized. We discuss:

  • the perils of DRM, and becoming dependent on manufacturers --- from printers, to toasters and beyond -- and how (or if) we can force control of our technological future
  • what lengths it’s permissible to go to when we're trying to effect change against the systems which might very well end the world as we know it;
  • if all of this fails, the ethical, philosophical and practical problems involved in waiting out the apocalypse in a high-tech, high-security bunker.

Grab Cory's new book Radicalized -- DRM and EULA free - at Craphound.com, or all the traditional online retailers.


In this episode, I consider the inter-state struggle over 5G, the rollout of which will create a new global surveillance surface. Who will control this massive new opportunity to surveil the world's data? If China gets its way, it will be Huawei, run by ex-Chinese-military officer Ren Zhengfei. And if the precedent of the world pharmaceutical market - almost completely controlled by China - is anything to go by, there may not be much anyone can do to stop them.  


First part of a two-part interview in which Tim Tayshun (AKA Tim Curry) of
BlockchainBTM discusses taking on OneCoin, the massive crypto Ponzi scheme responsible for bilking investors out of $4.6bn dollars.

We discuss: how OneCoin was supposed to work vs. the dismal reality, its colourful cast of leaders and the lengths they went to in order to establish OneCoin as a valuable investment, and the risk OneCoin posed to the growth of Bitcoin itself.


This is the second and final part of our interview with Enric Duran of the Faircoin / Faircoop project.

We discuss: the advantage of using Faircoin rather than Bitcoin or even Euros; the history of anarchism of in Spain and the use of pre-crypto 'scrip' currencies in and between anarchist communes; the need to build an infrastructure for the coming community of disaffected normies, and more.

We also take a long excursion into Enric's backstory as the 'Robin Hood' of the antiglobalisation movement: how he stole half a million euros plus from banks and gave it all to anticapitalist projects, and his ensuing life in the underground. And finally, we come around to the big question: how to get to a global Commons without requiring big-state communism. Bonus: the mysterious link between Ethereum, Vitalik Buterin and Enric Duran's commune Calafou.

This is part one of a two-part series with Enric Duran, leader of the Faircoin project and founder of Fair Coop. Faircoin is a fascinating experiment in cryptocurrency: a LETS-style community currency which also functions as an exchange-traded token. With it, Duran's Fair Co-op wants to power an international co-operative movement based on ideas and principles emerging from the Catalan Integral Co-operative: peer-to-peer organization, and horizontal governance by consensus.

We discuss how the Fair Co-Op project co-opted (!) the original Fair Coin for its own use; trust and reciprocity in small communities and how crypto can extend this into the wider world; and just how to think about the 'ecological cost' of Bitcoin as a means to create a truly trustless global exchange network.

Enric Duran raised around four hundred thousand Euros in 2008 by creating multiple overdrafts with fake solvency, and then invested this money into building the cooperative movement in Spain in 2008, leading to the creation of the Catalonia Integral Cooperative movement in 2010. Since 2014, Duran’s focus has been on working with FairCoop to generate the alternative ecological and post-capitalist ecosystem that FairCoin is based on.